James Wan Phone Number, Fan Mail Address, Autograph Request Info and Contact Details

If you want to know about James Wan’s real phone number and also looking for James Wan’s email and fanmail address then, you are at the correct place! We are going to give you the contact information of James Wan like his phone number, email address, and Fanmail address details.

How do I send a fan mail to James Wan?

Do you have a doubt about how to write a fan letter to James Wan? Please write a well-written fan letter in which you express your warm wishes, love, opinions, and pleasant greetings. A fan letter should be as short and sweet as possible. Remember to mention your favorite films, series, or shows. Please take note of James Wan’s fan mail address, which is listed below:

James Wan Contact Details:

REAL NAME: James Wan
NICKNAME: James Wan
DOB: 26 February 1977 (age 45 years)
BIRTHPLACE: Kuching, Malaysia
NATIONALITY: American
BIRTH SIGN: Pisces
PROFESSION: Director
FATHER: NA
MOTHER: NA
SIBLINGS: NA
SPOUSE / WIFE: NA
CHILDREN: NA
INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/creepypuppet
TWITTER: https://twitter.com/jamesjwan
FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/creepypuppet
YOUTUBE CHANNEL: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCHPtzo6V0ZHUVa6St8PSMpg

James Wan Phone Number, Fan Mail Address, Autograph Request Info and Contact Details

Fan mail address:

James Wan
Paradigm Talent Agency
700 N San Vicente Blvd.
Suite G820
West Hollywood, CA 90069
USA

James Wan Bio

James Wan is a Malaysian-Australian film director, producer, and screenwriter born on February 27, 1977. He is best known for directing Saw, Dead Silence, Death Sentence, Insidious, Insidious: Chapter 2, The Conjuring, The Conjuring 2, and Furious 7. Saw was his directorial debut, and he served as an executive producer on both Saw II and Saw III. In addition, he was the editor of the first short film.

James Wan collaborated with Shannon Young on the production of his debut feature-length film, Stygian, which was honoured with the award for Best Guerrilla Film at the Melbourne Underground Film Festival in the year 2000. This accomplishment came well before Wan’s success in the commercial film industry. Before 2003, Wan collaborated with his buddy and fellow screenwriter Leigh Whannell on the plot for a horror picture. After it was finished, Wan and Whannell wanted to choose a scene out of it and shoot it so they could use it to sell their picture to studios. Whannell and Wan could shoot the movie on a relatively cheap budget with Charlie Crouser, who had written the soundtrack for the short film, and a few stand-in actors. Whannell played the lead part of David.

After the extended cut of Saw was made available to the public, the movie was greeted with resounding acclaim at box offices in the United States and worldwide. The film made nearly $103 million globally, with $55 million coming in from the United States of America and $48 million from other nations. Because of this success, the company produced the sequel Saw II. Since its first release, the Saw franchise has grown to become the highest-grossing horror film series in terms of global unadjusted cash amounts. Saw is the second highest-grossing horror franchise in the United States, behind only the Friday the 13th films in revenue by $10 million. This ranking is only applicable to the United States. Since Wan and Leigh Whannell were responsible for creating the series, they have been recognised as executive producers for all of the sequels.

The conclusion of the Saw series was supposed to be marked with the release of Saw 3D. However, actor Costas Mandylor said that the film had been filmed with various potential endings so that the series could continue regardless of which one was ultimately chosen to be utilised. The sixth sequel kept up the profit margin performance of the first picture and made $136 million in the worldwide market while having a production budget of just $20 million.

In August of 2012, several online horror magazines reported that a source within Lionsgate, the production firm responsible for the series, had disclosed their plans to create an eighth Saw film. Nevertheless, when the information was made public, it was still in the “tinkering” stage. The film was originally going to be called Saw: Legacy when unveiled in 2016; however, it was then changed to Jigsaw. Wan and Whannell were credited as executive producers, even though they did not have an active role in the film’s production or subsequent sequels after the third movie.

In 2007, Wan directed a pair of full-length motion pictures. The first one was a horror film called Dead Silence, and it was the product of specific suggestions made by Wan and Whannell’s agency. The Australian actor Ryan Kwanten starred in the horror film Dead Silence, inspired by the urban legend of a ventriloquist’s ghost named Mary Shaw. According to folklore, Mary Shaw cuts off the tongue of anybody who cries when she is around. Wan referred to the picture as “a spooky doll movie” rather than a blood and guts horror flick. It has the same vibe as those classic episodes of The Twilight Zone or those Hammer Horror movies. Extremely traditional.”

Wan directed his second feature picture in 2007, an adaptation of the book of the same name written by Brian Garfield and titled Death Sentence. Kevin Bacon portrayed the lead role of the film’s protagonist, a grieving father who seeks vengeance against a neighbourhood gang responsible for the death of his kid. Whannell had a small role in the movie and played one of the gang members that Bacon’s character took down. Wan has characterised the movie as “a visceral and brutal vengeance thriller in the tradition of the seventies.”

Wan told CraveOnline that he was eager for “a little of time off simply to relax… but at the same time, I’m taking this chance to write again.” Wan had worked nonstop on the three films that came before this one. Wan directed the promotional video for the survival horror video game Dead Space, which EA Redwood Shores produced in 2008.

The next film that Wan directed was called “Insidious,” It had its world debut at the 2010 Toronto International Film Festival in the “Midnight Madness” section. The movie debuted in theatres throughout the United States for the first time during the first weekend of April 2011 and took third place at the box office, grossing an estimated $13.5 million over those three days. Within the first four hours after the completion of the premiere, it was purchased by Sony Pictures Worldwide for a seven-figure price.

The movie was produced without the involvement of a studio, and it starred Patrick Wilson, Rose Byrne, and Barbara Hershey. Wan wanted to have total control over the creative process and produce a picture that was quite different from the gory films that he had been known for, thanks to Saw. In an interview, Wan said that the absence of committee involvement in the production of Insidious “actually enabled me the liberty to develop a picture with plenty of spooky, odd moments that a company may not get.” To produce a horror movie that was in the same vein as The Sixth Sense, The Others, and the works of David Lynch, both Wan and Whannel sought to use tactics such as restraint and stillness.

After some time had passed, the website dedicated to reporting on horror films Bloody Disgusting verified Wan’s directing role in The Warren Files. The movie was initially titled The Haunting but was subsequently renamed The Conjuring, was based on the true stories of Ed and Lorraine Warren, a married couple who investigated claims of supernatural occurrences. The film focuses on the couple’s most famous case when they studied a witch’s curse on a Rhode Island family property. This case is second only to the Amityville haunting in terms of its notoriety.

In the movie, Patrick Wilson and Vera Farmiga portrayed the roles of the paranormal investigator’s Ed and Lorraine Warren, respectively. Wilson played Ed, while Farmiga played Lorraine. Late in February 2012, a shooting got underway in North Carolina, which is located in the United States. In the beginning, New Line Cinema and Warner Bros. Pictures planned to launch the movie on January 25th, 2013, as their release date. During October 2012 New York Comic-Con, a test screening was held, and the crowd reacted very enthusiastically. At that point, Wan still had several weeks left till the end of filming the movie. The movie was released in July 2013, and since then, it has garnered praise from film reviewers and moviegoers.

Following the conclusion of production on The Conjuring, Wan helmed the second instalment of the Insidious film series. The new film’s screenplay was written again by Wan’s longtime colleague and close friend, Leigh Whannell, while the actors from the first film reprised their roles. Production on the follow-up movie commenced in January 2013 and was finally released on September 13 of that same year. One news source referred to the film’s budget as a “shoestring,” which fits the description well. The original director of the Paranormal Activity films, Oren Peli, is involved in the production as an executive producer. Insidious: Chapter 2 was subsequently released by Film District.

After it was announced that Justin Lin, the director of the previous four instalments of the Fast and Furious action franchise, would not return as a director, Wan began negotiations with Universal Pictures in early 2013 to direct the seventh instalment of the Fast and Furious action franchise. Additionally, on a shortlist of candidates, Wan was considered for the director role with Jeff Wadlow, Baltasar Korm├íkur, and Harald Zwart. A definitive confirmation that Wan would direct was made public in April 2013, when Lin stated, “It’s time for me to move on to other things, and I’m thrilled that Universal and Neal have selected James Wan to lead the franchise into its new chapter.” Wan has directed several critically acclaimed films, including Saw, Insidious, and The Conjuring.

In April 2015, the movie “Furious 7” was released in theatres. It ended up being the most successful picture in the series in terms of income at the box office and critical acclaim. Garry Maddox of The Sydney Morning Herald announced on October 20, 2014, that Wan had reached an agreement with New Line Cinema to film The Conjuring 2 as part of a significant and long-term arrangement with the company. Toby Emmerich, the head of New Line Cinema, claimed that New Line believed James Wan to be “in a class by himself,” As a result, Wan was the only filmmaker with whom the company inked a contract. The movie was first made available on June 10th, 2016. It was revealed in June 2015 that Wan will be directing both “Aquaman” and “Robotech.”

James Wan’s first feature-length film, Stygian, which he co-wrote and directed with Shannon Young and received the award for “Best Guerrilla Film” at the Underground Film Festival in the year 2000, came out before he had any success in the more commercial sector of the film business. Wan became popular after working with fellow Australian Leigh Whannell, a screenwriter and director, to develop a story for a horror film. The two drew inspiration from their nightmares and anxieties while writing the movie. Saw, which became one of the most successful films in the United States and abroad, was based on the screenplay that these two individuals subsequently authored. As a result of the movie’s global revenue of over US$103 million, its creators generated a profit that was more than 80 times greater than their initial investment.

After Wan and Whannell created the Saw franchise, they collaborated as executive producers on subsequent films in the series, including Saw II, Saw III, Saw IV, Saw V, Saw VI, and Saw 3D: The Final Chapter. Wan directed the feature films Dead Silence and Death Sentence in 2007. Ryan Kwanten, an Australian actor, stars in the movie Dead Silence, about a ghost of a ventriloquist named Mary Shaw. Mary Shaw’s spirit is said to remove the tongue of anybody who screams when she is around. The book Death Sentence, written by Brain Garfield, was the basis for the film of the same name. The film’s main character is a father, portrayed by Kevin Bacon, who is obsessed with exacting retribution for the death of his kid at the hands of a local mafia. Wan has been quoted as saying that the flick is “my arthouse movie with firearms.”

Wan then went on to film Insidious, which had its world debut at the 2010 Toronto International Film Festival and hit theatres in April 2011. The movie was a huge success, and it ended up being the third highest-grossing picture at the box office that year; total revenue from ticket sales for the movie was $13.5 million in the United States. Following the debut of Insidious, Wan indicated in an interview that he would be interested in doing action and romantic comedy films if he could find some decent material to work with. However, Wan kept up his trend of making horror movies, and in February 2012, he began production on the film that would become known as The Conjuring. The movie, released in July 2013, was met with accolades from audiences and film reviewers of the highest calibre.

Wan began work on the sequel to 2010’s Insidious, named Insidious: Chapter 2 and was released in September 2013, while he was still working on The Conjuring. Early on in 2013, Wan initiated discussions with Universal Pictures over the possibility of directing the seventh instalment of the Fast & Furious film series. In April 2013, Wan received the final confirmation that he would direct Furious 7. Two years later, in April 2015, the picture became the most successful film in the Fast and Furious Franchise in terms of box office revenues and critical acclaim.

How can I request an autograph from James Wan?

Do you have a concern about how to send James Wan an autograph request? Please write a nice autograph request letter and attach a picture as well as a self-addressed stamped envelope. Don’t forget to use a piece of cardboard to write “DO NOT BEND” on an envelope. Please wait a few weeks or months for getting a reply from James Wan. Your signature request should be sent to the following address:

Fanmail Address

James Wan
Paradigm Talent Agency
700 N San Vicente Blvd.
Suite G820
West Hollywood, CA 90069
USA

What is the best way to contact James Wan?

Do you wish to get in touch with a celebrity you applaud? One method to get your message through is to contact your favorite celebrity’s agency (publicist office). James Wan’s phone number is (310) 288-8000 and the Fax number is (310) 288-2000.

Best Methods to Contact James Wan:

It is simpler to contact James Wan with the below-written contact ways. We have composed the authenticated and verified communications methods data as given below:

1. James Wan TikTok: NA

James Wan has TikTok Account under his own title name. He is posting his videos regularly. Follow TikTok and also get the latest updates and video recordings from his account.

2. James Wan Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/creepypuppet

The most famous social media site is Insta. On Insta, you’ll find each person’s profile as well as a renowned person. You may also communicate with them via direct messaging if you use it. You may also use Instagram to view his Instagram profile and recent photos.

3. James Wan Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/creepypuppet

The most well-known social media site is Fb. Each and every renowned person’s description could well be found on Facebook. You may also connect with them by text messages or DM. You may also check their Facebook page and fresh pics by visiting Facebook.

4. James Wan Twitter: https://twitter.com/jamesjwan

Using the famous social networking platform Twitter, it is easier to spot and contact prominent people. You can write to their Twitter handle so that he can see it and respond asap.

5. James Wan Phone Number, House Address, Email:

Here we discuss the most common contact methods like the phone number of James Wan, email address, and fanmail address.

Phone number: (310) 288-8000
Email id: james@jameswan.co

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